Welcome

The Royal Pavilion is a former royal palace built as a home for the Prince Regent during the early 1800s and is notable for its Indo-Saracenic architecture and Oriental. Other Indo-Saracenic buildings in Brighton include the Sassoon Mausoleum, now, with the bodies reburied elsewhere, in use as a chic supper club. Brighton Pier (originally and in full "The Brighton Marine Palace and Pier", and for long known as the Palace Pier) opened nvq health and social care in 1899. For further information please VisitBrighton and BrightonLife.

It features a funfair, restaurants and arcade halls. The West Pier was built in 1866 and has been closed since 1975 awaiting renovation, which faces continual setbacks, The West Pier is one of only two Grade I listed piers in the United Kingdom, but suffered two fires in 2003. Brighton is also famous for buildings designed by Howe, David C and the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Plans for a new landmark in its place – the i360, a 183 m (600 ft) observation tower designed by London Eye architects Marks Barfield – were announced in June 2006. Plans were approved by the council on 11 October 2006. As of early 2009, construction had yet to begin, but the area has been cordoned off.

Created in 1883, Volk's Electric Railway runs along the inland edge of the beach from Brighton Pier to Black Rock and Brighton Marina. It is the world's oldest operating electric railway.

Brighton, Design Capital of the South

You can visit the historic Brighton Pavilion; wander around the Lanes, Brighton's famous warren of narrow Georgian streets; see a show at the Brighton Centre or local theatres and take a walk on Brighton Pier with it exciting attractions. Closer still is St James's Street with its pubs, clubs, restaurants to suit all tastes. If it is nightlife you are seeking, Brighton is the ideal town, with many clubs within easy walking distance.